Monthly Archives: January 2013

Swamp Orchid

Moose Orchid

So here I am doing it again, attempting to draw, and probably not doing justice to the flower.  The top of the flower is yellow, and then it reaches red towards the end of the flower.  I’ve tried to capture some of the veins in the flower as well as the overall feel of the flower.  Let me know what you think of it.

This is one of the more unusual orchids, and is known as the moose orchid.  In South Australia it is found only in swamps whereas in the eastern states it can be found outside of swamps in moist areas.  It is one of the few South Australian orchids with evergreen leaves.

A Spotted Summer Orchid

Dipodium pardalium is distinguished from D. roseum by the small pink spots, not stripes, found on the labellum.  These two species are very similar having the same flower shape and size and growing in the same habitat.  However D. pardalium is considered rare in South Australia.  Recently I observed that on the Fleurieu Peninsula that this species was more readily found than the common hyacinth.  Yet in the Adelaide Hills D. pardalium was hard to find.

Pardalinum

The spotted hyacinth orchid is probably my favorite of the two species.  Generally it has white flowers covered in dark pink spots.  It does not have as much variation as the roseum but sometimes the flowers can have a soft pink colouring and the stems of this species can be dark red right through to green.

Bee Pollinater D. pardalinum

These orchids do flower right through our summer and thus experience the hot weather.  The orchids struggle on 40 C (104 F) and the flowers can abort. On a good year about a quarter of the flowers will be pollinated.  It is suspected that the two Dipodium species in the Adelaide Hills have different pollinators, but more research is required here. However it is pollinated by a small native bee.

Dipodium pardalium

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A Common Summer Orchid

Dipodium roseum – Common Hyacinth Orchid

In summer there are not many orchids which are found flowering.  However the Dipodium family has a couple of species that show themselves during our hot season.  The most common of these is the Dipodium roseum which is also the most frequently photographed orchids in the Adelaide Hills.

Dipodium roseum (23)

It can be quite varried, from deep pink through to white flowers, with both colours found on both dark brown stems and green stems.  These variations have caused some to suspect that there might be several species, but they all the one species.

Dipodium roseum

This plant distinguishes is by its spike of pink flowers that can be up to a metre high.  This species is noted for having stripes on its labellum.  The other Dipodium which can be found in the Adelaide Hills has spots on the labellum.

DSC05773

The Hyacinth Orchid is very different from other orchids as it has no leaves, and relies on fungi from stringy barks.  Due to this fact, this orchid cannot be propagated.

Dipodium roseum

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Welcoming a new year

Greetings all and a happy new year!  OrchidNotes has grown gradually, and has become quite an exciting blog for me, and my fellow writers here.  Hopefully this year we will continue with many more interesting articles, and plenty of pictures of our beautiful native Australian orchids.

The common hyacinth orchid, Dipodium roseum

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 6,300 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 11 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.