The little fellow

Pterostylis pedunculata – Maroon-hoods

Pterostylis pedunculata

This is an attractive little greenhood.  It has a distinct maroon top on the flower and its sepal.  I’ve only seen this orchid with a single flower per stem.  It is a reasonably common orchid, growing in most regions of South Australia, as well as in Victoria, Tasmania, New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory.

Pterostylis pedunculata

It can often be found in open areas of woodlands, and colonizes easily.  It has a relatively long flowering time, first appearing in late July, and sometimes still flowering up until November.  There is a small rosette of leaves at the base of the plant.  The leaves are crinkled on the top, and spaced wider apart than on other Pterostylis species, such as P. nutans or P. curta.

This is one of the easier orchids to grow.  It is quite a hardy little fellow.  Often this orchid can be introduced to sites through mulch.  The picture on the left shows a maroon hood which was found last year (2012) in the heart of the Adelaide city CBD.

Below is a pretty amazing colony growing in someones front lawn.  So for those who really want to grow orchids, this is one of the easier ones to grow.  (But don’t remove them from the wild, as that is illegal.)

An unusual colony growing in a suburban front lawn. Special thanks to Gordon Ninnes for permission to use his picture.

An unusual colony growing in a suburban front lawn.
Special thanks to Gordon Ninnes for permission to use his picture.

Pterostylis pedunculata

Know Them

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “The little fellow

  1. fifteenacres

    We’re supposed to have some of these too. My friend showed me some, and that was while my camera battery was flat. Do you think I can find them again? No. Thanks for the description and photos. It will give me a better idea of what I’m looking for. Today I did find a patch of ten Waxlip Orchids, and they are opening in other places too.

    Reply
    1. Helen Post author

      I hope you are successful finding them again. They are quite common. Sometimes the orchids can go into “hiding” just to annoy us! I’ll be looking forward to seeing some pictures on your blog when you find them.

      I also came across a delightful patch of Waxlip Orchids, today. There would have been over a hundred plants in less than a couple of metes. They were all in bud, but they are going to be quite a spectacular show in a couple of weeks when they flower.

      Have fun orchid hunting.

  2. fifteenacres

    Over a hundred? That would be spectacular! Last year we had a very large patch of Blunt Greenhoods, but that was before I developed an interest in orchids, so when it was pointed out, I thought it was good, but didn’t photograph them. This year, the patch has not re-grown. 😦

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s