Category Archives: sanguinea

Between the rain

Yesterday morning, I took the opportunity to go orchid hunting, as it will be raining for the next few days.  Fortunately while I was out there, the weather was rather forgiving, but there was a very light shower.  The birds seemed to be enjoying themselves, but were too fast for me to capture.

water

I really love it how these Linguella nana’s (syn. Pterostylis nana) are having a conversation.  They were the first flowers I found of this species, after having seen plenty of leaves and buds.

Linguella nana

I always find it interesting the height difference of Urochilus sanguineus (syn Pterostylis sanguinea).  I am fascinated by the height difference that can be found at one site, though the actual flower size is the same.  These look amazing with the sun coming through the flowers, but this time the sun was hiding.

Urochilus sanguineus

DSC00687

I also saw the Bunochilus viriosus (syn P. viriosa), which is often found growing along side the Urochilus sanguineus.

Bunochilus viriosous

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Camera dies…

Finally, I was able to go and hunt for some orchids.  But my camera died!

So my camera for taking macro photography thinks that everything is white.  Fortunately, Dad very kindly lent me his camera, thank you Dad!  So I was able to take some orchid pictures to share with you all.  I saw lots and lots of leaves.  There were so many.  It could be that this is going to be a good year for finding orchids.  We will have to wait to see how the year unfolds.  Some of the different leaves that I saw included Arachnorchis, Glossodia major, Bunochilus viriosous and Thelymitra.  Below is a very nice field of Nemacianthus caudatus.  This orchid will be flowering in the coming month.

Nemacianthus caudatus

I also checked out my favourite little spot of Corysanthes diemenica.  The leaves were emerging, and there were some tiny little buds beginning to appear.

Corysanthes diemenica

I was also able to find some orchids in flower.  There were quite a few plants of Urochilus sanguineus.  This species will continue flowering for several more months.  It has a relatively long flowering time.  I have written about this species previously for the Know Them series.  The flowers were lovely and fresh, and I believe this is when they have the best colouring.

Urochilus sanguineus

And the other orchid I saw in flower was the tiny Mosquito orchid, Acianthus pusillus.  This species also has a long flowering time, and will be finishing in August.

Acianthus pusillus

Some of these trees where covered in the fungi pictured below.  I thought it looked quite pretty.  Enjoy your long weekend!

Fungi

I want/need a new camera now!  I would prefer a digital SLR, any suggestions?

The long and short of it

Urochilus sanguineus – Maroon Banded Greenhood

This species used to be listed as a Pterostylis, and is similar strucurally to the Bunochilus.  Often it is found with Bunochilus, but they have not been known to hybridize.  It has a labellum which is sensitive to touch.  The plant will either produce a flowering stem, or a sterile leaf.

Winter orchids: Linguella sp. Hills nana, Urochilus sanguineus

This species flowers from May to September, and can be found in most regions of South Australia, as well as Western Australia, Tasmania and Victoria.  It is believed that this plant may have originated from the west, as most Urochilus species are endemic to Western Australia.  South Australia only has this species.

Quite often I’ve seen a variety of heights of these orchids, on the same site, at the same time.  This is mainly due to the nutrients of the soil where the plants are growing.  The dwaft plants are called ‘depauperate’.  Another feature of these orchids is they can grow in clumps or as a single plant.

The flowers can be difficult to photograph as they are very darkly coloured.  However with the afternoon sun coming through them they are beautiful.  Taking photos of them with a flash makes these flowers almost look black, and hides the loveliness of these flowers.

I’ve provided two pictures below of this species, the first from the southern and the second from the northern Mt. Lofty Ranges to show there is really no difference despite location.  Overall the species only varies in height, and the flowers fade with age.

Know Them