Tag Archives: pink

In Summer…

After having four consecutive days of over 40C (104F) heat, I’m pretty sure that there are not many orchids left in flower now.  However a weeks ago, the hyacinth orchids were in full glory.  Dipodium roseum is one of the most photographed orchids in Australia.  It is often found on road side edges which makes it easy to spot.

Dipodium

It is one of the largest terrestrial orchids and can grow a few feet high.  It grows around Stringy Bark trees as it needs a special fungi to survive as it has no leaves.  Can you spot it/them in the picture below?

DSC02938

This particular species is distinguished by having stripes (rather than spots) on the labellum.  The flowers vary from pink to a soft white, and can be growing on either a dark stem on green stem.  Personally I prefer the pink flowers on the dark stems and sometimes seem to forget the other variety.  Here are two variations growing together.

dipodiumKeep cool/warm depending where you are!

A beauty

A couple of posts ago, I mentioned that I wanted to see some Arachnorchis rigidaI was able to do this last week, and they looked as beautiful as ever.

Arachnorchis rigida

Arachnorchis rigida

These orchids are quite small as can be seen in this picture.  There were fourteen plants in flower with two in bud.

Arachnorchis rigida

There were quite a lot of other orchid species that I saw both in bud and in flower.  It was a very good site, and I am looking forward to heading back soon to get some more photographs.  Have a good weekend.

A Common Summer Orchid

Dipodium roseum – Common Hyacinth Orchid

In summer there are not many orchids which are found flowering.  However the Dipodium family has a couple of species that show themselves during our hot season.  The most common of these is the Dipodium roseum which is also the most frequently photographed orchids in the Adelaide Hills.

Dipodium roseum (23)

It can be quite varried, from deep pink through to white flowers, with both colours found on both dark brown stems and green stems.  These variations have caused some to suspect that there might be several species, but they all the one species.

Dipodium roseum

This plant distinguishes is by its spike of pink flowers that can be up to a metre high.  This species is noted for having stripes on its labellum.  The other Dipodium which can be found in the Adelaide Hills has spots on the labellum.

DSC05773

The Hyacinth Orchid is very different from other orchids as it has no leaves, and relies on fungi from stringy barks.  Due to this fact, this orchid cannot be propagated.

Dipodium roseum

Know Them

Random Reflection

With it less than a week away from Christmas, and a bit more than a week before a new year, I find myself unable to decide what to write for today’s post.  This year as been a reasonable year for orchids, though unfortunately, I have been unable to see them as often as I would have liked to.

At present there are not many orchids in flower.  The hyacinths orchid and a few swamp species are flowering now.  The common hyacinth orchid, Dipodium roseum, incidently is one of the most photographed orchids in the Adelaide Hills, and is often found along road sides.  It is easily spotted due to its pink flowers and standing a couple of feet high.

Have a blessed Christmas!